Archive For 20/05/2019

Southern Charolais sale grows

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In its 15thyear, theSouthern Charolais Breeders Group Sale has grown to include more studs and offer more animals.
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The event’s chairmanKen Manton, Clarinda Charolais, Hansonville, said the eight studs would be an outstanding quality lineup of 51 bulls and eight females on Wednesday March 1.

Peter Godbolt, Landmark stud stock Albury, NSW, called last year’s sale, which attracted buyers from throughout Victoria and interstate.

He said the catalogue included a large range of modern genetics, including some from overseas, and plenty of outcross proven bloodlines, which meantbuyers would have a great opportunity to purchase quality cattle to add value to their herd.

This year’s sale includes lots from six Victorian studs:Allednaw, Chenu,Clarinda, Karingal, Lawaluk and Waterford; and two NSW studs: Airlie and Challambi.

This year, 45 of the 51 bulls are polled, and Mr Manton said that increasing percentage reflected more clients wanted polled animals.

Most of the bulls will be 18 months to two years old.

Mr Manton said the breed was growing in popularity as people realised the benefits of Charolais’ rapid growth, extra weight, quality of meat and temperament –including in cross-breeding operations.

“Lot feeders love Charolais because of their consistency – they know the quality of meat and the growth,” he said.

By usingmore modern genetics, including through artificial insemination and embryo transfers, Charolais stud breeders have also improved the breed’s birth weight and calving ease.

Vendor Bec Keeley, son Mitchell Pickering, 7, buyer Peter Fogden, agent Nigel Rollbusch and vendor Colin Pickering with last year’s equal top-priced bull.

The sale will be held at the Yea saleyards for the second time.

Mr Manton said buyers reported liking the venue last year, and appreciated the ability to view the bulls and cows easily becausethey wereingood size yards.

The group of passionate Charolais breedersis hopefully the sale will be at least as successful as last year, when from six studs 27 of 31 bulls sold to $10,000 twice and averaged$4426; and 11 of 15 females sold to $3750, av $2627.

Mr Manton said they’d had many Gippsland buyers in previous years and last year people from South Australia and NSW also joined the buying gallery.

Nigel Spink, Challambi Charolais, Tooma NSW, said he was excited to be a vendor for the first time this year.

Mr Spink wants to raise the profile of the stud he started in 2011, focused on more polled genetics, low birth weights and cattle that can finish off grass or at an early age.

He started withembryos from the Glenlea and Palgrove cows, followed by purchases of heifers from Glenlea and Rangan Park. He has used artificial insemination to build quality bloodlinesinto the herd.

“People are becoming more aware of the gain from hybrid vigour –particularly using Charolais over British breeds,” Mr Spink said.

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Council considering 40km/h limit for CBD

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Traffic in downtown Bendigo could be limited to no more than 40km/h under a proposal being considered by the City of Greater Bendigo.
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The suggestion is a response to the high number of accidents involving pedestrians in the central business district, with pedestrians involved in a total of 28 crashes in the CBDarea during the past five years.

The city’s engineering and public space manager Brett Martini said the idea was in its early stages and council staff had not yet formed a view on whether it should proceed or canvassed the support of residents.

“If it turnsout that we think there’s some merit in it we would certainly go through a community consultation process, but at this stage we’re still working through whether we think speed zones and other treatments are practical and viable solutions,” he said.

“Wehave had some pedestrianaccidents within the CBD and so that’s one of the options that are available.”

The proposal was revealed in response to a petition from community members in Eaglehawk calling for the speed limit there to be reduced as part of a call for improvements to safety in Victoria Street.

The petition will be considered at next week’s regular council meeting, with city staff recommending councillors endorse actions to address the residents’ concerns, includingreinstallation and relocation of current speed signage andtrimming of vegetation.

Also on the agenda is a recommendation to adopt theStrathfieldsaye Town Centre Urban Design Framework and award the $2.5 millionstage onecontract for the Strathfieldsaye Community Hub.

Meanwhile the date of this year’s Bendigo Cup public holiday will be finalised following the vote, with city staff recommending Wednesday, November 1 as the most appropriate date, being the last Wednesday before the Melbourne Cup is run on November 7.

The cup has been held on the last Wednesday of October for the past seven years, but the recommendation states the later date of this year’s Melbourne Cupnecessitatesthe move.

Pending the endorsement of her peers at the meeting, councillor Andrea Metcalf will also join councillor James Williams as a second city representative to theEpsom Ascot Huntly Structural Flood Mitigation Advisory Group.

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Regal Stride streets his rivals yet again

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The start was always likely to decide the outcome of the Claiming Pace at Devonport on Friday night and that’s the way it turned out.
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Short-priced favourite Tisu Toota, chasing his fifth win in a row,didn’t begin as quickly as usual and Regal Stride was able to zoom to the front.

From then on, the Ben Yole-trained gelding was always in control and he strolled home 12 metres clear of Cromac Jamie and Mighty Spark.

It was the second runaway win in the space of five days for the seven-year-old who also thrashed his rivals in the Claimer at Mowbray last Sunday.

“He’s flying–it wasjust how he won last week,” driver Mark Yole said.

“As soon asI got to the front I knew I was right.

“Tisu Toota has been lightning away lately but tonight my horse finally put it all together from a stand.

“Normally he begins safe but it can dependon how long they hold them.

“He likes to be on the move and, if hehas to stand for too long, he backs back a bit.”

Yole said he had been confident of winning even if Regal Stride didn’t lead.

“The way he went last weekI felt he probably could have nearly sat outside Tisu Toota and still won,” the driver said.

“Since Ben freshened him, he’s been a different horse. He’s fresh in the mind and loving racing again.”

Yole said that Regal Stride’s stablematePushkin, an all-the-way winnerfor driver Natalee Emery in the C1 Pace, was in much the same boat.

TOO GOOD: Regal Stride, driven by Mark Yole, scores a runaway win in the Claiming Pace at Devonport on Friday night. Picture: Greg Mansfield

He was also followingup a big win at Mowbray five days earlier.

“Pushkin has found his right couple of races where he’s been able to lob on top,” Yole said.

“Before that, hehad a lot of bad draws and was off back marks in stands where hehad to do too much work.

“Being able to get on top, just changes their minds.”

Three claims were lodged for unplaced runner Jukebox Music and his new owner was to be decided by ballot.

Jukebox Music was well backed to win the race but got shuffled back in the run and had no luck.

THE THIRD HEATof the Allen Williams Memorial saw in-form Stowport trainer-driver Craig Hayes lead all the way on former King Islander Herbie Haze.

Another in-form trainer, Shelley Barnes, won the C4/C5 Pace with Moto Kenny who rated a smart 2:00.3 while John Castles trained a double courtesy of Dayraid and Spot Eight.

Dayraid was given a soft run behind the leader by Gareth Rattray and finished a shade too well for pacemakerDellas Command to score by a metre.

Spot Eight, also driven by Rattray, showed that he wasn’t just a front-runner when he came from the rear of the field to record his third win from his past four starts.

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Striding to easy win

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The start was always likely to decide the outcome of the Claiming Pace at Devonport on Friday night and that’s the way it turned out.
Nanjing Night Net

Short-priced favourite Tisu Toota, chasing his fifth win in a row,didn’t begin as quickly as usual and Regal Stride was able to zoom to the front.

From then on, the Ben Yole-trained gelding was always in control and he strolled home 12 metres clear of Cromac Jamie and Mighty Spark.

It was the second runaway win in the space of five days for the seven-year-old who also thrashed his rivals in the Claimer at Mowbray last Sunday.

“He’s flying –it was just how he won last week,” driver Mark Yole said.

“As soon as I got to the front I knew I was right.

ALL ALONE: Regal Stride, driven by Mark Yole, spaced his rivals in the Claimer at Devonport on Friday night to record his second runaway win in five days. Picture: Greg Mansfield

“Tisu Toota has been lightning away lately but tonight my horse finally put it all together from a stand.

“Normally he begins safe but it can dependon how long they hold them.

“He likes to be on the move and, if he has to stand for too long, he backs back a bit.”

Yole said he had been confident of winning even if Regal Stride didn’t lead.

“The way he went last week I felt he probably could have nearly sat outside Tisu Toota and still won,” the driver said.

“Since Ben freshened him, he’s been a different horse. He’s fresh in the mind and loving racing again.”

Yole said that Regal Stride’s stablemate Pushkin, an all-the-way winnerfor driver Natalee Emery in the C1 Pace, was in much the same boat.

He was also followingup a big win at Mowbray five days earlier.

“Pushkin has found his right couple of races where he’s been able to lob on top,” Yole said.

“Before that, hehad a lot of bad draws and was off back marks in stands where hehad to do too much work.

“Being able to get on top, just changes their minds.”

The third heat of the Allen Williams Memorial saw in-form Stowport trainer-driver Craig Hayes lead all the way on former King Islander Herbie Haze.

Another in-form trainer, Shelley Barnes, won the C4/C5 Pace with Moto Kenny who rated a smart 2:00.3 while John Castles trained a double courtesy of Dayraid and Spot Eight.

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Resarch finds healthy vision lies in the great outdoors

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Outside benefits: Researchers have found that play time outside is beneficial for children’s health – including their eyesight.How often do your children play outside?
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I would not be surprised if you said it was not very often given the heat wave we are having and the well-known effects of too much sun.

However it is important that children have time outside each day.

There are lots of benefits of all kinds to be gained from spending time outside regularly.

Research shows that children who engage in outdoor play are healthier, and the opportunities for large body movements offered outside (running, jumping, playing on the trampoline etc) contribute to better body shape and body image, and help improve children’s sleep.

Outdoor play also offers opportunities for children to connect with nature and there is a lot of evidence now to show that connection with nature helps improve children’s health and wellbeing.

A recent study from the Queensland University of Technology introduced me to a new (to me) idea about the importance of outdoor play.

The studyshowed that twohours a day spent outside helps protect children’s eyes and helps prevent short-sightedness (myopia).

Myopia is the name for the condition where the lens in the eye does not focus the image onto the retina, rather it focuses the image in front of the retina. That means when looking at something in the distance, the image is blurry.

Children with myopia struggle to read what is written on the blackboard at school, and may not be able to read signs or recognise people when they are far enough away from them (I’ve spent my whole life worrying that people might think I am rude because I fail to recognise them when passing in the street!)

It has been predicted that within the next 30 years, nearly half of all the world’s population will have myopia.

Those of us who live in relatively affluent nations like Australia manage our myopia with glasses and/or contact lenses, although many parents struggle to cover the costs of providing these for their children, particularly when the glasses are lost or broken regularly.

However, there are many peoplein the world who do not have the financial resources to provide visual aids for their condition, and this can make a huge difference to children in school and in their lives outside of school.

The researchers from the Queensland University of Technology said their results showed that even for children who already have myopia, spending time outside every day can help slow the deterioration of their sight.

These QUT researchers are not alone in their conclusion – a large study from China has also indicated that increased myopia was associated with longer times spent indoors.

Clearly, we need to carefully create opportunities for children to play outside, juggling sun safe requirements with the need to expose children’s eyes not only to outdoor light but to the wide vistas the outdoor environment provides to stimulate our vision.

As long as our summer continues as it is, that juggle is going to be difficult but it is very important that we keep up our juggling act.

Margaret Sims is a Professor of Early Childhood at the University of New England in Armidale.

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